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Dwight Trible
"With the ironic age gasping its last, Dwight Trible should be acclaimed king. More than a singer, the guy is our main local conduit for cosmic electricity; he opens his mouth and the spirit pours out.".
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- Greg Burk, L.A. Weekly, 2005.
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"To call Trible’s manner of singing “Unique” is not simply to misuse the word and mean “Unusual.” Nobody else does what he does, or at least not with the same precision and intensity. He uses whole dimensions that other singers don’t even know about. While climbing and falling in pitch with the best of them, he also manipulated the volume, the direction, and the distance from the microphone with which he sang, oscillating from soft and still to powerful and commanding." .
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-- Colin Marshall, Santa Barbara Independent, August 20, 2008. .
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“When vocalist Dwight Trible entered, initially with sweet, suspended tones, eventually arriving at a warmly spiritual musical greeting, the performance reached an extraordinary level of collective communication....”.
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“The balance of the set shifted away from Coltrane and into a multilayered version of ‘Body and Soul,’ with particularly imaginative contributions from the gifted Trible. (At a time when male jazz singers are in such short supply, it’s astonishing that talents inferior to his are receiving so much more attention.) A hand-clapping blues - displaying Sanders’ considerable versatility - wound matters up.”.
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-- Don Heckman, LA Times, July 18, 2002 .
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"We’ll begin by saying that if you’re a jazz writer, you never call nobody a genius. All the other way smarter writers look at you and wonder how you could be dumb enough to call somebody a genius. And the poor bastard you called a genius gets stuck with the label. “Hey genius,” the other players say, “You can’t figure that out?” So we would never call Dwight Trible a genius. But man, does he blow our mind! We’ve never heard singing like this..
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His voice is an instrument, yeah, but more than an instrument, more than a voice. We don’t know what it is. A lot of you out there will hate it; it’ll creep you out - it’s just too different - but a lot of you will be pinned to your barstools, scared to move lest you knock over a glass and interfere with the sound.... You can’t describe Dwight Trible. Words bounce of what he does like bugs on a windshield." .
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-- Brick Wahl, LA Weekly 2011 .
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(With Pharaoh Sanders)
“Sanders moved forward from that point with a set that seemed oriented toward covering the numerous other stylistic elements contributing to his musical growth. A second tune emphasized harmonic improvising, and a third featured Trible’s splendidly versatile voice in a ballad performance reminiscent of Johnny Hartman’s work with Coltrane.”

-- Don Heckman, LA Times, June 8, 2006..
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“... Trible moved into the spotlight, eyes closed, head tilted back, and delivered a sound of such luxuriant resonance, supplication and hurt that some patrons stopped their fingers mid-snap and gawked, while others, burnished in the half-light of the bar, slid eagerly from their stools and squatted beneath him on the floor. A star, apparently, was being born, and the moment was reminiscent of of antique scenes in jazz history where established - but largely unknown - jazz masters such as Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie got their first exposure to astonished, virginal audiences outside the black community.” .
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- The Peacemaker, SoSoCal 1998